Wisconsin Dem governor moves to suspend in-person voting primary-eve over coronavirus fears

Fox News reports Wisconsin Democratic Gov. Tony Evers on Monday abruptly suspended in-person voting for the state’s scheduled Tuesday primary, setting up a new clash with the state’s GOP-controlled legislature.

The governor’s last-minute, election-eve executive order also moves in-person voting for the April 7 contest to June 9 and directs state lawmakers to meet Tuesday in special session “to address the election date.” The order states that if the legislature doesn’t pass a bill moving the primary’s date, voting will occur on June 9.

Republican leaders instantly pushed back.

“We are immediately challenging this executive order in the Wisconsin State Supreme Court,” tweeted Speaker Robin Vos.

Evers’ move came as Wisconsin was attempting to do what no other state has tried to do – hold in-person voting at polling amid the coronavirus pandemic – as most Americans huddle in their homes to avoid the spread of the deadly COVID-19 disease caused by the virus.

The governor took action one day after mayors of some of Wisconsin’s biggest cities pleaded for a delay in the election.

In a letter to the state’s Department of Human Services, 10 mayors representing some 1.3 million residents warned that if in-person voting takes place on Tuesday, it would put “hundreds of thousands of citizens at risk by requiring them to vote at the polls while this ugly pandemic spreads.”

Hours before the governor signed his executive order, the state’s elections commission put out a list of 10 things voters should know before heading to the polls.

Evers’ move came as Wisconsin was attempting to do what no other state has tried to do – hold in-person voting at polling amid the coronavirus pandemic – as most Americans huddle in their homes to avoid the spread of the deadly COVID-19 disease caused by the virus.

The governor took action one day after mayors of some of Wisconsin’s biggest cities pleaded for a delay in the election.

In a letter to the state’s Department of Human Services, 10 mayors representing some 1.3 million residents warned that if in-person voting takes place on Tuesday, it would put “hundreds of thousands of citizens at risk by requiring them to vote at the polls while this ugly pandemic spreads.”

Hours before the governor signed his executive order, the state’s elections commission put out a list of 10 things voters should know before heading to the polls.

Read more here.