Trump Explains Why Judge Napolitano May Have a Vendetta Against Him

Fox News legal analyst Judge Napolitano has recently been a harsh critic of President Trump.

President Trump reacted to Napolitano’s latest criticism Sunday, on Twitter, and gave a possible reason why the judge may have something against Trump.

In a piece the judge wrote for Fox News, Napolitano makes the case that President Trump committed obstruction of justice.

On obstruction, the report concluded that notwithstanding numerous obstructive events engaged in by the president personally, the special counsel would not charge the president and would leave the resolution of obstruction of justice to Congress. Congress, of course, cannot bring criminal charges, but it can impeach.

Trump initially claimed that he had been completely exonerated by Mueller — even though the word “exoneration” and the concept of DOJ exoneration are alien to our legal system. Then, after he learned of the dozen or so documented events of obstruction described in the report, Trump used a barnyard epithet to describe it.

President Trump suggests that Judge Nap is angry because she did not get a place on the SCOTUS and that his “friend” was not pardoned.

From Daily Caller 

President Donald Trump tweeted after Saturday’s rally in Wisconsin an attack on Judge Andrew Napolitano, claiming the judge had come to him privately to ask for a Supreme Court nomination.

“Thank you to brilliant and highly respected attorney Alan Dershowitz for destroying the very dumb legal argument of ‘Judge’ Andrew Napolitano….” Trump began, following his praise of Harvard professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz with an immediate pivot to an attack on Napolitano.

“….Ever since Andrew came to my office to ask that I appoint him to the U.S. Supreme Court, and I said NO, he has been very hostile! Also asked for pardon for his friend. A good ‘pal’ of low ratings Shepard Smith,” the president concluded.

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Trump appeared to be referring to the fallout from the recently-released Mueller report, which Napolitano has argued on his Fox Nation show “Judge Napolitano’s Chambers” stands as proof that the president obstructed justice.

“Prosecutors prosecute people who interfere with government functions and that’s what the president did by obstruction, where is this going to end? I don’t know, but I am disappointed in the behavior of the president,” Napolitano said, calling that behavior “immoral,” “criminal,” “defenseless” and “condemnable.”

Dershowitz responded to Napolitano’s comments by noting during an appearance on “The Ingraham Angle” that because it was within the president’s purview to terminate the investigation or fire special counsel Robert Mueller, any attempts he made to do so could not be described as “obstruction.”

“In my introduction to ‘The Mueller Report,’ I go through the elements of obstruction of justice,” Dershowitz explained. “The act itself has to be illegal. It can’t be an act that is authorized by Article II of the Constitution.”