Social Media Users Wonder Why Warren is Still in the Race After Buttigieg Drops Out

A number of social media users questioned why Elizabeth Warren is still in the race after Pete Buttigieg, who has 3 times as many delegates as her, has decided to drop out.

Pete Buttigieg has more than triple the pledged delegates than Warren.

He’s dropping out but she’s staying in.

Seems like her campaign is looking to damage the Sanders delegate lead as much as possible. This is not something you do if you want to pass a progressive agenda.

Pete Buttigieg outperformed Warren in Iowa, NH, NV, and SC, now dropped out.

CNN reported Warren campaign focused on “blunting the momentum” for Sanders.

Sanders raised $46.5 million in February to Warren’s $29 million.

Why continue to split progressive vote?

Buttigieg has finished ahead of Warren in every state, yet he’s dropping out and she’s staying in.

Pete Buttigieg outperformed Warren in IA, NH, NV, and SC and still dropped out before she did…

Per TCO, a new memo released by Team Warren seems to indicate the goal is to win a contested convention.

The prediction model of 538 currently gives Warren close to a zero percent chance of winning the nomination outright and a 60% chance at a convention with no candidate receiving a majority.

Fox News reports in a head-turning memo Sunday, Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s campaign declared that “the reality of this race” is that “no candidate will likely have a path to the majority of delegates” at the July Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee, Wis. — setting out in stark terms the possibility of a bruising convention that party leaders have long feared, and outlining Warren’s strategy for winning the presidential nomination there in a dramatic “final play.”

Michael Tracey tweeted in response:

Warren campaign admits that their goal is to steal the nomination from Bernie through corrupt deals at the convention. But remember, it was a grave moral crisis when some Bernie supporters online tweeted animal emojis

The post by Roger Lau from Team Warren, posted on Medium writes:

But as the dust settles after March 3, the reality of this race will be clear: no candidate will likely have a path to the majority of delegates needed to win an outright claim to the Democratic nomination.

Super Tuesday is the first test in March to amass delegates, but a week later we will be competing in six states, and a week after that another four that represent over 500 delegates up for grabs. By the time all of California’s votes from mail-in ballots are counted, likely in mid-March, we will still only be halfway to the overall number of pledged delegates up for grabs.

From there we will be competing in contests in the rest of March: Georgia, the Northern Mariana Islands, and Puerto Rico, and early April: Alaska, Hawaii, Louisiana, Wyoming, and Wisconsin. All of our 400 Super Tuesday organizing staffers will be re-deployed to states voting in March or April.

After Wisconsin nearly one-third of the pledged delegates will still be waiting to be elected, and there will be a three-week gap between electing delegates for the first time since voting began. In the road to the nomination, the Wisconsin primary is halftime, and the convention in Milwaukee is the final play.

Our grassroots campaign is built to compete in every state and territory and ultimately prevail at the national convention in Milwaukee.

Fox News reports in a head-turning memo Sunday, Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s campaign declared that “the reality of this race” is that “no candidate will likely have a path to the majority of delegates” at the July Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee, Wis. — setting out in stark terms the possibility of a bruising convention that party leaders have long feared, and outlining Warren’s strategy for winning the presidential nomination there in a dramatic “final play.”