REPORT: Senate Dems Privately Worry Trump Will Be Tough to Beat in November

A Democrat Senator that requested anonymity admitted to the Hill that Democrats are concerned President Trump will be tough to beat in November.

Among the reasons are the current rise of Bernie, the fall of Biden, and Trump’s resilient approval ratings.

The senator also told The Hill that mounting anxieties are “reflective of not just the candidacies but of how Trump is raising all this money and how he’s really focused.”

“They’re targeting their people,” the Senator acknowledged “they’re going to get their people out.

TheHill reports Senate Democrats are privately acknowledging that President Trump will be very tough to beat in November if the economy stays strong and he draws on the substantial advantages of running as an incumbent.

Publicly, Democratic lawmakers are putting on a brave face, but behind closed doors anxiety is mounting over the unraveling of former Vice President Joe Biden’s White House bid and the failure of impeachment to put a dent in Trump’s approval ratings.

One of the chief concerns is that Trump, who has a virtually uncontested path to the Republican nomination, will have a big head start to prepare for the general election.

His reelection campaign is already spending heavily to reach out to voters on Facebook, and the Republican Party is solidly unified behind him.

Meanwhile, Sen. Bernie Sanders’s (I-Vt.) victory in Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary has made clear to some Senate Democrats that the party’s primary is likely to drag on for months.

In particular, they worry the party will remain divided until the summer convention and fear a reprise of 2016, when lingering resentment among Sanders’s supporters over the Democratic National Committee’s favoritism toward eventual nominee Hillary Clinton dampened voter turnout in the fall.

“I hear comments all the time that after what’s happened in the first two primaries we only have a 50-50 chance. It’s not looking good,” said a Democratic senator who requested anonymity to talk about the private concerns of colleagues.

One of the biggest surprises to lawmakers is the poor performance of Biden, who has performed well against Trump in hypothetical matchups.

Though Biden led his Democratic rivals in national polls over the past several months, he finished in fourth place in the Iowa caucuses, with 15 percent of the vote, and dropped to fifth place in the New Hampshire primary with a paltry 8 percent.

Others red flags are Trump’s resilient approval rating, despite months of an impeachment inquiry followed by a weeks-long trial, and the amount of money his campaign is raising and spending.