NYC Taxi Regulator Advises Drivers on “Preferred Pronouns” Including Ze/Hir/Zir

A new article from Newsday reveals that NYC Taxi, the City’s regulator has advised it’s drivers on preferred pronouns for passengers.

The new “Inclusive Language Tips” request drivers ask a passenger what their preferred pronoun is.

NYC Taxi claims “using someone’s preferred pronoun is a simple way to show respect” and includes pronouns such as “ze” and “ve” as examples.

Newsday reports Taxicab and app-hail passengers should be asked their preferred pronouns — and drivers should not assume that physical appearance corresponds to traditional notions of male and female — New York City’s taxi regulator advised drivers this week.

Drivers should also consider sharing their own pronouns, according to the advisory, “Inclusive Language Tips,” emailed to the city’s approximately 200,000 licensed drivers of taxicabs and for-hire vehicles like Uber.

The tips are not new policy; they are just suggestions, not binding rules, according to Rebecca Harshbarger, a spokeswoman for the regulator, the Taxi & Limousine Commission, which licenses the industry.

“Using someone’s preferred pronoun is a simple way to show respect,” according to the email, which suggests “they” or “ze” as a default in cases in which the driver does not want to ask.

The taxi regulator’s email comes as the culture undergoes a linguistic introspection over how to refer to people. Some say their sex as listed on their birth certificate does not correspond with their gender identity — an inner sense of female, male or a hybrid of both or none at all. To express this identity, some use a different pronoun, not only “he” or “she” but also “they,” “ze,” “ve,” and others, and the corresponding declensions.

The taxi regulator’s email comes as the culture undergoes a linguistic introspection over how to refer to people. Some say their sex as listed on their birth certificate does not correspond with their gender identity — an inner sense of female, male or a hybrid of both or none at all. To express this identity, some use a different pronoun, not only “he” or “she” but also “they,” “ze,” “ve,” and others, and the corresponding declensions.