JUST IN: Stacey Abrams Under Ethics Investigation

Stacey Abrams is facing a new ethics investigation, complete with subponeas for her 2018 campaign bank records.

ABC 22 reported that the ethics commission plans to subpoena bank records from Abrams’ 2018 gubernatorial campaign and groups that helped raise money for her.

It was not immediately clear what complaints have been filed against the campaign.

Democrat Abrams lost the hotly-contested race to Republican Gov. Brian Kemp. In recent months, she has been rumored to seek another run at the office, the Georgia Senate or even start a presidential campaign.

Recently, Abrams stirred controversy when she called Georgia’s anti-abortion “Heartbeat Bill,” evil.

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From Atlanta News

The new director of the state ethics commission plans to subpoena bank records from the campaign of 2018 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams and groups that raised money to help her in last year’s nationally watched race.

Former Douglas County prosecutor David Emadi, who started his new job Monday, also said his office will soon decide whether to prosecute the campaigns of Atlanta mayoral candidates.

Emadi’s predecessor, Stefan Ritter, was accused of stalling investigations after the commission audited campaign reports from the organizations last year.

Ritter, who was also accused of watching porn at work, resigned earlier this year.

Abrams is expected to announce soon whether she will run for the U.S. Senate or president next year, or run for governor in 2022.

Lauren Groh-Wargo, Abrams’ former campaign manager, said, “The Abrams campaign worked diligently to ensure compliance throughout the election and, had we been notified of any irregularities, would have immediately taken action to rectify them.

The new director of the state ethics commission plans to subpoena bank records from the campaign of 2018 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams and groups that raised money to help her in last year’s nationally watched race.

Former Douglas County prosecutor David Emadi, who started his new job Monday, also said his office will soon decide whether to prosecute the campaigns of Atlanta mayoral candidates.

Emadi’s predecessor, Stefan Ritter, was accused of stalling investigations after the commission audited campaign reports from the organizations last year.

Ritter, who was also accused of watching porn at work, resigned earlier this year.

Abrams is expected to announce soon whether she will run for the U.S. Senate or president next year, or run for governor in 2022.

Lauren Groh-Wargo, Abrams’ former campaign manager, said, “The Abrams campaign worked diligently to ensure compliance throughout the election and, had we been notified of any irregularities, would have immediately taken action to rectify them.

“The new ethics chief — a Kemp donor and former Republican Party leader — is using his power to threaten and lob baseless partisan accusations at the former Abrams campaign when they should be focused on real problems like the unethical ties between the governor’s office and voting machine lobbyists instead.”

While not getting into specifics of the commission’s investigation, Emadi made general remarks about the cases after being introduced to reporters by ethics commission Chairman Jake Evans on Thursday.

“Those investigations are all moving forward,” Emadi said. “What I can say about the investigation into the Abrams campaign is, in the relatively near future, I expect we will be issuing subpoenas for bank and finance records of both Miss Abrams and various PACs and special-interest groups that were affiliated with her campaign.”

More than a dozen “independent groups,” mostly funded by out-of-state donors, were created in Georgia last year to help support Abrams’ effort. Emadi said he expects the documents the commission will review will be “voluminous,” likely meaning the investigation will take time.