Dems Opposed Travel Bans Now Being Implemented Worldwide to Slow Coronavirus

Most Democrats in congress were opposed to travel bans now being implemented worldwide to slow the spread of coronavirus.

On March 5, 2020, Rep. Judy Chu (D-Calif.) introduced the “No Ban Act” which states.

This bill imposes limitations on the President’s authority to suspend or restrict aliens from entering the United States and terminates certain presidential actions implementing such restrictions. It also prohibits religious discrimination in various immigration-related decisions, such as whether to issue an immigrant or non-immigrant visa, unless there is a statutory basis for such discrimination.

The President may temporarily restrict the entry of any aliens or class of aliens after the Department of State determines that the restriction would address specific and credible facts that threaten U.S. interests such as security or public safety.

This bill imposes limitations on the President’s authority to suspend or restrict aliens from entering the United States and terminates certain presidential actions implementing such restrictions. It also prohibits religious discrimination in various immigration-related decisions, such as whether to issue an immigrant or non-immigrant visa, unless there is a statutory basis for such discrimination.

The President may temporarily restrict the entry of any aliens or class of aliens after the Department of State determines that the restriction would address specific and credible facts that threaten U.S. interests such as security or public safety.

It was co-sponsored by 219 House Democrats.

Now, in an effort to combat the coronavirus pandemic, travel bans are being implemented not just in the United States but throughout the world.

Per a WashingtonExaminer report from March 10th, in light of the coronavirus outbreak, President Trump barred foreign nationals who have been inside China or Iran within the last 14 days from entering the U.S.

Travelers from South Korea and Italy have to be screened for fever and other symptoms before and after their flights.

The bill was designed to target the controversial travel ban approved by the Supreme Court in June 2018, which many opponents see as just a different iteration of a Muslim ban.

Known as the No Ban Act, it would reverse restrictions on the countries under the travel ban and strengthen provisions in the Immigration and Nationality Act that prohibit religious discrimination.

The Supreme Court’s decision allowed the administration to restrict entry from citizens of seven countries — Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela and Yemen — because they were determined to be uncooperative in sharing information the U.S. needed to vet incoming visitors. The version approved by the Supreme Court allowed citizens from those countries to apply for waivers from the ban.

A new version of that plan went into effect last month, with Mr. Trump expanding the list to 13 countries, adding Burma, Eritrea, Kyrgyzstan, Nigeria, Sudan and Tanzania. The new countries are subject to a less restrictive ban, as only applicants from certain programs are affected.